Increasing Spice Production through establishing new nurseries

Case of Nemele Women group

The Nemele women’s group is among the Uluguru Spice Project (USP) II farmer groups mobilized by a farmer facilitator called Richard Simon of the Numbini Vanilla group in Lugeni village. The Nemele Women’s group is in Tandari village, Mtombozi Ward. The group was first established in 2015 with 22 members. Their joint formation was due to their willingness to have a poultry project, and they started the project by supplying chickens within and outside the village.

The secretary of the Nemele Women’s group explained how she understands the intervention back in 2020 when Richard Simon met with them for the first time during the mobilization of the new farmer groups in 2020 through the F2F approach as follows:

In 2020, Richard came to our village to mobilize different groups which later will be in the spice project (USP). He described how agro-ecological spice cultivation in the Uluguru mountains will help many people in the production of organic spices. Also, he added that although the groups would receive technical instruction on the production of organic spices, they will also receive assistance with farming inputs including the right kind of equipment and seeds.

As a group, we had two days of brainstorming meetings on the opportunity that was ahead of us through the spice project. One of the driving forces that made them want to be involved in spice production is that they had few spices on thief farms and solely food crops like paddy and cassava predominated. For most of them, only own two to three spice trees and were ignorant about organic spice production and this was a perfect opportunity to learn more and further about organic agriculture.

Nemele women group with their spice tree seedling nurseries-cinnamon and clove.

The group began receiving facilitation and technical training on the organic spice modules as well as farming equipment and seeds after voluntarily deciding to join SAT under Uluguru Spice Project II through Richard Simon as the farmer facilitator.

The Nemele women group received cloves and cinnamon seedlings in 2020 just after joining SAT under the USP II project, therefore currently they have 1438 cloves seedlings and 200 cinnamon seedlings in their nurseries. They expect to distribute equally to each member of the group and each member will plant on his/her farm as per the technical training they received about organic agriculture. The group sees an opportunity in the market of their spice produce which is cinnamon, ginger, and cloves through the spice cooperative (CHAUWAVIMU), so through the techniques, they have learned like intercropping, application of compost manure, mulching, and use of biopesticides they expect to increase production in these crops.

We are really appreciative of the Uluguru Spice Project since it gave us the information we needed to produce organic spices.

The group secretary added

They believe with technical backstopping and other facilitation from SAT facilitators and Richard they still have a good position in spices production.


“KILIMO HAI !!!!!, VIUNGO NI DHAHABU ILIYOJIFICHA!!!!”

Spices are gold in their hidden form

The USP Project is kindly supported by Austrian Development AgencyLand Voralberg, and Fester Foundation.

Implementation of Internal Control System

Case of Ramadhani Sanda

Ramadhan Sanda is a spice farmer in Kinole village who is a member of the MMO Viungo farmer’s group. He is 66 years old, has one wife, and has nine (9) children. He got involved in growing spices after he joined the MMO group in 2017, so far they have been collaborating with Sustainable Agriculture Tanzania (SAT) on the Uluguru Spice Project (USP), and in 2021, the MMO Farmer group was among the 23 other farmers groups selected to implement Internal control System (ICS).

His main source of income is agriculture. He currently has 4 acres of intercropped spices under cultivation, including cinnamon, cardamom, vanilla, and black pepper.

Ramadhan organic farm

Ramadhan Sanda has experience in organic agriculture and he has been producing organic spices in the Uluguru Mountains since 2017 which led him to be one of the best spice producers under the USP project.

He stated, “I have been participating in a number of courses and trainings about the production of organic spices, both inside and outside the farmer’s group, which were arranged by SAT.”

Therefore, through the farmer’s group, he qualified to be a spice producer under the internal control system (ICS). According to Ramadhan Sanda, ICS is the system that shows they are real spice producers because it encourages farmers to produce organically.

Ramadhani at one of the storage units in Kinole Village

He goes on to say that the system enabled him to be a diligent farmer who produced in accordance with ICS standards. The system benefits farmers greatly since it increases productivity through improved farm management, quality enhancement, and post-harvest handling.

Ramadhani benefits from the lucrative market of his organic produce as in 2021 he sold over 400 Kg of black pepper to SAT Holistic group Ltd at a premium price.


The USP Project is kindly supported by Austrian Development AgencyLand Voralberg, and Fester Foundation.

SAT Saving and Lending (SSLG) Bring a Better Life!

Case of Numbini Vanilla group member

Boniface Paskali Mkulani, a 33-year-old father of two children and one wife, who is a member of the Numbini Vannila Group, one of the famous and potential spice groups under the USP II project, He joined a group in 2017. Mr. Boniface lives in the Morogoro district in Mtombozi ward in Numbini village. His main source of income is agriculture, especially in spice products (mint, vanilla, and cloves). Since joining the group, Boniface has received training on spice organic agriculture production, entrepreneurship, and savings and lending.

Mr. Boniface mint farm

In 2017, the group started the component of saving and landing, in which group members have a room to save their money and get low interest rate loans. In this component, about 100% of the group members benefit from it, and Mr. Boniface was one of them.

He decided to borrow 500,000 TZS from SSLG in 2021 and put it toward mint production. He received 1,000,000 TZS after four months, which he used to purchase three acres of land for growing spices and to give back to the neighborhood by purchasing water pipes to irrigate his plots during the dry season. By using the same irrigation systems for their plots, neighboring farmer groups Songambele and Numbini also profited.

Water pipes Mr.Boniface uses for irrigation

According to Boniface Paskali Mkulani, SAT SSLGs are a crucial part of SAT groups because they keep farmers connected even during the off-season. In addition, loaning procedures are straightforward and loans can be obtained quickly.

The USP Project is kindly supported by Austrian Development AgencyLand Voralberg, and Fester Foundation.

CALL FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

TRAINER (S) TO PROVIDE TRAINING ON SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELLING TO AGRICULTURAL TUTORS FROM AGRICULTURAL TRAINING INSTITUTES 

Sustainable Agriculture Tanzania (SAT) is seeking to hire a Trainer(s) to conduct Social Psychology and counseling training for agricultural tutors from 29 Agricultural Training Institutes. The trainer (s) is free to propose the methodologies and tools that will be used in the training. These Terms of Reference (ToR) serve as a request for proposals from individual consultants/firms interested in conducting this training. 

The objective of the assignment 

The objective of this assignment is for agricultural tutors to improve their skills, knowledge, and confidence in the provision of psychology and counseling to students. The tutors will be capacitated in social and educational psychology as well as counseling to be able to support students in areas of learning, participation, dealing with academic and social challenges, mental health, and overall academic performance to be able to improve according to expectations. 

Expected outcomes of the training. 

At the end of the training, we expect that the trainees will be able to: 

  • Explain the concept of psychology and counseling; 
  • Provide basic psychology and counseling to students; 
  • Explain the concept of intellectual development; 
  • Explain the concept of how learning occurs and to use acquired knowledge and skills to support students in their academic careers;
  • Understand the concept of psychological disorders especially those that would interfere with students’ academic outcomes and relationships with colleagues and tutors; 
  • Recognize anxiety, anger, self-esteem, and social anxiety problems and provide advice accordingly and 
  • Develop their unique counseling framework for handling abuse of any form, providing psychology and counseling to students and staff. 

Expected deliverables 

The following deliverables are expected from the facilitator/trainer. 

  • A technical proposal indicating the detailed training methodologies, training contents, sources, three-day training program, and training materials will be discussed and approved by SAT team before training starts. 
  • Carry out face-to-face training to trainees for 3 days 
  • Comprehensive training report of the training assignment 
  • Deliver notes which may be shared in soft or hard copy materials 
  • An electronic copy of all training materials and contents including presentations, videos, and other resources of relevant materials on social psychology and counseling. 

Profile/consultancy requirements 

  • Master’s degree in psychology or social work with demonstrated strong experience in social work/counseling or another related field that is in line with the training objective and scope of the assignment (item 4.0 and 5.0 or any relevant field); 
  • Demonstrated experience and proven records in undertaking similar assignments; 
  • Minimum 7 years experience as a psychological counselor, social worker, and educational psychologist in a variety of cases 
  • Have experience in the field of facilitation of training and especially social psychology and counseling; 
  • Excellent analytical, interpersonal, communication, reporting, and facilitation skills, including in multi-cultural settings; 
  • Evidence of having undertaken similar assignments, at least 3 references of clients; 
  • Awareness of the cultural and social context of non-majority and working with vulnerable groups will be considered an advantage and 
  • Proficiency in adult-learning principles. 

Application and Documentation 

Interested qualified trainers are invited to submit their applications. Trainers who meet the requirements should submit the following; application letter (EOI), Curriculum Vitae, conceptual inception report showing how you intend to achieve the stated objectives, previous experience (sample work and references), proposed five days training program, and budget for undertaking the assignment. Please send your application electronically via consultancy@kilimo.org by 29th June 2022 with the subject line of the email Social 

Psychology and counseling Training. A review of proposals will be done on the 1st of July 2022. Award giving of the assignment to the suitable trainer will be on 4th July 2022. NB: The deadline for submission of EOI will be on 29th June 2022 at 1700hrs East African Time. Late EOIs and portions of EOI, shall not be accepted for evaluation irrespective of the circumstances. Only awarded consultant(s) will be contacted. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCOPE OF WORK PLEASE FIND THE TERMS OF REFERENCE HERE

CALL FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

Overview 

Sustainable Agriculture Tanzania (SAT) is seeking to hire a Trainer(s) to conduct customer relationship management training for front desk officers from the ministry of agriculture and supporting staff from 29 Agricultural Training Institutes. The trainer (s) is free to propose the methodologies and tools that will be used in the training. These Terms of Reference (ToR) serve as a request for proposals from individual consultants/firms interested in conducting this training. 

The objective of the assignment 

The success of any organization depends on how they treat internal and external customers. Customers need correct information from people whom they trust within an organization. Developing a customer-centric organization, whereby employees will take responsibility of taking care of their customers is therefore very crucial. 

The objective of this assignment aims at enabling participants to provide outstanding customer service and identify efficient and innovative ways of providing quality service within their respective Departments in the Ministry of Agriculture and Agricultural Training Institutes. It is also expected to motivate staff members to find innovative solutions to the challenges they encounter in executing their daily tasks. Therefore, the training provider shall include all the basic concepts and best international practices necessary to achieve the stated objective of this training program which is geared toward assisting organizations in identifying methods for building customer-centric organizations that will automatically improve organizational performance. 

Expected deliverables 

The following deliverables are expected from the facilitator/trainer. 

  1. A technical proposal indicating the detailed training methodologies, training contents, sources, three-day training program, and training materials will be discussed and approved by SAT team before training starts. 
  2. Carry out face-to-face training to trainees for 3 days 
  3. Comprehensive training report of the training assignment 
  4. Deliver notes which may be shared in soft or hard copy materials 
  5. An electronic copy of all training materials and contents including presentations, videos, and other relevant materials on customer relationship management. 

Application and Documentation 

Interested qualified trainers are invited to submit their applications. Trainers who meet the requirements should submit the following; application letter (EOI), Curriculum Vitae, technical proposal showing how you intend to achieve the stated objectives, previous experience (sample work and references), proposed five days training program, and budget for undertaking the assignment. Please send your application electronically via consultancy@kilimo.org by 25th June 2022 with the subject line of email Customer Relationship Management Training. A review of proposals will be done on the 20th of April 2022. Award giving of the assignment to the suitable trainer will be on 28th June 2022. NB: The deadline for submission of EOI will be on 25th June 2022 at 1700hrs East African Time. Late EOIs and portions of EOI, shall not be accepted for evaluation irrespective of the circumstances. Only awarded consultant(s) will be contacted. 

NB 

No phone calls or in-person applications will be accepted, so there is no need to follow up. 

To learn more about the scope of work please download the ToR here

Kick Off of the Organic Now Initiative

Having a wide variety of well-branded organic products filled on shelves in the supermarkets and local markets can raise more awareness and increase demand for organic products. Imagine walking into a store and finding a section only filled with eye-catching products all labeled 100% organic, won’t you be interested to have a look? Without even having a special campaign simply having markets shelves filled with organic products can change the mindset of people and result in an increase in demand for these products.

An organic label on a product tells a consumer that the product was produced free of chemicals thus protecting the environment and health of the body by guaranteeing high nutritional value. 

Product display during the Kick-Off meeting of the organic now initiative

Although organic agriculture is going mainstream around the world, still currently the consumption of organic products is limited in the Tanzanian market,  so affecting the health of people and the environment. The lack of a wide variety of organic products in the markets has resulted in a lack of awareness of the organic products by most local people. Also, there will be no increase in the production of organic products if there is no demand, at present the volume of organic products produced is limited to mainstream grocery chains.

It’s our responsibility to increase demand by increasing awareness about organic products that will lead to impacting more farmers’ lives by the rise in uptake of organic farming practices and also impact workers, and consumers directly, because the biggest challenge facing the organic sector is the knowledge gap that spans between the marketing system, across the whole value chain from the farm to the table and value delivery network in the market.

Farmers should be well equipped with knowledge and resources to produce organic products while entrepreneurs/SMEs should be able to process, product develop, certify, brand, and market more varieties of organic products to the local and international markets. Finally, to amplify awareness of these organic products should be filled with shelves, open more organic shops across the country and supply them with the products.

The Organic Now Initiative!

To strengthen this center of excellence in the value chain an initiative had to begin, Sustainable Agriculture Tanzania (SAT), in partnership with KaziYetu and IamOrganic (Organic Now Consortium) pioneered the Organic Value Chain project (OVCP) to take an incubator role by mentoring other SMEs and improving what they have.  

This started with the Kicking off the Organic Now initiative which supports the diversification of processed organic products (EAOPS) within the organic market in Tanzania by supporting and empowering entrepreneurs/SMEs to learn from proven practices of production and marketing and to improve and certify their organic products. This will result in the creation of job opportunities and a market for organic produce from farmers who practice organic agriculture.

To kick off the initiative, the consortium organized and conducted 3 days of training on organic agriculture, contract farming, and organic certification from 28th to 30th April which was attended by 19 SMEs. Entrepreneurs from different locations across the country like Arusha, Dodoma, Manyara, Zanzibar, Tabora, Lindi, and Dar es Salaam attended the training which was held at SAT’s Morogoro town offices and SAT Headquarters in Vianzi at the Farmer Training Centre (FTC). The kickoff meeting was the beginning of the bigger movement but it mainly introduced the entrepreneurs to the project and gave them an overview of organic farming and certification.

Participants from different SMEs listened carefully to the presentation from SAT.

During the kickoff meeting, the participants were taken through the whole journey of the initiative to the final impact which increasing consumers’ awareness about organic products by having a variety of products that are well branded and hence increasing demand. To push the initiative to reach its impact, there has to be a commitment from the consortium side as well as the entrepreneurs’ side. To ​​attend intensive all the training programs which they were presented with throughout 2022, also to have an ongoing engagement with the initiative and the program team by 2023, and participate in all organized events.

Filled with the urge to know more about the organic sector entrepreneurs had a lot of questions for the organizers of the training.

Questions like Which organization is responsible for certifying East Africa standards? How SAT network as a stakeholder? How can organic farmers afford competition from conventional farmers? Which kind of certificates are supposed to be used during the selling of the product: farmer’s certificates or processor’s certificates?

One of the participants writes his questions during the Q & A session.

All this shows how much they are interested to know about organic agriculture and the opportunities that lie within it.

To present their marketing skills, all the participants had an opportunity to present their products and give a small sales pitch to the audience convincing each other to buy the products. It was an interesting exercise where each one was given 3 minutes top and was able to wind up every crucial detail in a limited time. Followed by a tour of the processing unit at SAT’s town office and the next day at the farm. Participants were happy and more interested in how the whole operation is carried out.

The participants also went to SAT’s Farmer Training Centre in Vianzi to learn about organic farming basics and get hands-on experience with farming techniques.

The initiative has been carried out with the entrepreneurs learning about product development through Foodlab training on different food processing and preparation methods. They have now finished learning about business plan development organized by KaziYetu.

This Initiative is under the Organic Value Chain Project (OVCP) which is kindly supported by the Biovision Foundation

CALL FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

TRAINER (S) TO PROVIDE TRAINING ON AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION FOR AGRICULTURAL TUTORS FROM 29 AGRICULTURAL TRAINING INSTITUTES.

Sustainable Agriculture Tanzania (SAT) is seeking to hire a Trainer(s) to conduct Project planning and management training for tutors from 29 Agricultural Training Institutes. The trainer (s) is free to use any workable methodologies that will be used in the training. These Terms of Reference (ToR) serve as a request for proposals from individual consultants/firms interested in conducting this training.  

The objective of the assignment 

The main objective of Agricultural Extension training is to equip 29 agricultural tutors with knowledge and skills in agricultural extension. Training tutors responsible to train students on Agricultural Extension is an essential step towards enabling effective delivery of the curriculum. After the training, the tutors are expected to work together to prepare a draft compendium/training manual on Agricultural Extension. The developed compendium will be used as a teaching and learning resource for both tutors and students. 

Expected deliverables 

The following deliverables are expected from the facilitator/trainer. 

  1. Inception report indicating the detailed training methodologies, training contents, sources, five-day training program, and training materials will be discussed and approved by SAT team before training starts. 
  2. Carry out face-to-face training to trainees for 5 days 
  3. Comprehensive training report of the training assignment 
  4. Deliver notes which may be shared in soft or hard copy materials 
  5. An electronic copy of all training materials and contents including presentations, videos, and other resource-relevant materials for agricultural extension. 
  6. Technical advice on Agricultural Extension compendium development to SAT management and the task team. 
  7. Proof-reading of the draft compendium on Agricultural Extension once developed by the Task Team

NOTE: The training report will be produced after one week from the date of the training closure. Training notes and other resource materials should be provided during or at the end of the training. 

Time span of the training 

This training is expected to be carried out for a period of 5 days (from 27th June to 1st July 2022). 

Profile/Consultancy requirements 

  • At least a master’s degree in the areas of Agricultural Extension based on areas shown in the objective and the scope of the assignment (item 4.0 and 5.0 or any relevant field); 
  • Excellent knowledge of agriculture program planning and management and its application in running agricultural programs and proficiency in adult learning principles; 
  • Demonstrated experience and proven records in undertaking similar assignments; 
  • Minimum 10 years experience in agriculture program planning and management consultancies; 
  • Have experience in the field of facilitation of training and especially agricultural extension program planning and management; 
  • Excellent analytical, interpersonal, communication, reporting, and facilitation skills, including working in multi-cultural settings; 
  • Evidence of having undertaken similar assignments, at least 3 references from clients, and 
  • Working experience with senior officials within the government and non-government organizations 

Proposed modality of payment 

Upon signing of the contract before the start of the assignment, the first installment of 50% of the agreed sum amount will be paid. and then 50% after finishing the entire assignment and handing over the reports for the assignment. 

Application and Documentation 

Interested qualified trainers are invited to submit their applications. Trainers who meet the requirements should submit the following; application letter (EOI), Curriculum Vitae, conceptual inception report showing how you intend to achieve the stated objectives, previous experience (sample work and references), proposed five days training program, and budget for undertaking the assignment. Please send your application electronically via consultancy@kilimo.org by 23rd June 2022 with the subject line of email Agricultural Extension Training. A review of proposals will be done on the 24th of June 2022. Award giving of the assignment to the suitable trainer will be on 24th June 2022.

NB: The deadline for submission of EOI will be on 23rd June 2022 at 1700hrs East African Time. Late EOIs and portions of EOI, shall not be accepted for evaluation irrespective of the circumstances. Only awarded consultant(s) will be contacted 

PLEASE FIND THE TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR THE TRAINER (S) TO PROVIDE TRAINING ON AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION FOR AGRICULTURAL TUTORS FROM 29 AGRICULTURAL TRAINING INSTITUTES CAN BE FOUND HERE.

Participatory Action Research in Tanzania, finding solutions for pastoralists to increase climate resilience

Pastoralists through participatory research have learned that employing suitable land preparation and incorporating cattle dung, will enhance cattle feed production and quality to address livestock feed needs throughout the year, especially during the dry season when they have been experiencing animal feed deficit. Working with researchers on a step-by-step approach has aided farmers and pastoralists in overcoming various challenges on the ground and gaining a deeper grasp of multiple solutions.

Pastoralists listening attentively to the facilitator about African foxtail grasses in the field

What is the core problem?

Pastoralist groups have always been migratory in quest of better pastures and water. They had no time to grow animal feed or they had less fodder to feed their cattle and these led to pastoralist grazing their animals, on crop farms or crop residuals during the dry season, when natural grasses are unable to endure drought, resulting in major tension between them and farmers or other land users and hence a prolonged conflict between them. The decrease in grazing land and water scarcity partly caused by increased population and climatic change effects has led the pastoralist communities to change their lifestyles to tackle some of these challenges.

Through the Farmers and Pastoralist collaboration (FPC) Project, funded by the Biovision Foundation, farmers and pastoralists can currently coexist peacefully by using acknowledged agroecological practices and benefiting from each other through a circular economy. So, both sides benefit by increasing income, improving food security, reducing conflicts, and strengthening climate resilience. Farmers and pastoralists have been taught how to produce their own pasture and the importance of having their own land for pasture production.

Now,

During the 7th WPRD workshop in December 2020, pastoralist and farmers presented their problem, which is how they can maximize the production of their pastures for livestock to feed throughout the dry season, and a researcher from Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) decided to conduct participatory research together with pastoralist from Mela village based on the problem they presented during the workshop.

Mr. Onesmo Ngenzi, master’s student from Sokoine University of agriculture together with pastoralists and field facilitators.

What is participatory research?

Farmer-centered research (FCRP) is a research platform that develops solutions for small-scale farmers and pastoralists who use agro-ecological farming methods. The FCRP decentralizes the research process and puts farmers at the center. Through this process, farmers and pastoralists can voice their needs to the research community. Until now we have conducted 82 research studies of which 71 are completed and 11 are ongoing, involving 79 research students of which (68 have completed and 11 are ongoing students) out of the 79 students 66 students are Bachelor’s students and 16 are Master’s student. These participatory researches have helped farmers to get practical solutions for their farming and livestock problems.

Through this approach, farmers and pastoralists own the complete research throughout the development stage of the research problems. The third pillar of SAT, “Research,” is implemented with the help of FCRP. The obtained knowledge and expertise are put to the test and the outcomes are shared with the community.

How do participatory research help farmers and pastoralist?

Understanding research and its value can assist us in solving a variety of difficulties.

“Research has formalized curiosity,” as the expression goes.

This is directly related to what we do in agriculture. Pastoralists would like to cultivate high-quality pasture (nutritional content) that may be used all year round. To learn how to boost pasture productivity and quality, extensive research must be conducted.

However, not all farmers have the technical expertise or financial resources to perform research that can aid them in overcoming these obstacles. Pastoralists living in remote areas of Morogoro district in Mela village participated in participatory research with SUA master’s student researcher Mr. Onesmo Ngenzi.

The study was conducted over a period of five months by observing the growth of grasses using different technologies of preparing nursery seedbeds and the use of different amounts of cow dung. The study’s major goal was to discover acceptable techniques of soil preparation including no-till, flat till, and sunken beds preparation for pasture establishment. Other observation measures were manure composting and its application looking for manure application rate per hector. 

The plot area where the research was conducted

The hypothetical behind this research was that all of the treatments (tilling type and manure rating) will bring the effect of biomass of the pasture which will be analyzed at the laboratory. The increase in pasture production and quality will meet the needs of livestock throughout the year. The grass that was used was African foxtail grass (Cenchrus ciliaris).

Also, the amount of cow dung used was categorized into four; that is, 0 tons per hectare, 5 tons per hectare, 10 tons per hectare, and 15 tons per hectare. A total of 36 blocks were used in the study. 12 blocks were not plowed at all, 12 other blocks were plowed but were flat, and 12 blocks were sinking. Where each of the blocks, was fertilized with a different amount of dung.

Finally,

The research reveals that pastoralists could begin grazing their land with flat nurseries made of cow dung (10 to 15 tons per hectare), harvesting and storing it for the dry season when grazing is sparse. This will lessen conflicts between pastoralists and other land users, which have resulted in a variety of losses, including livestock and human deaths, as a result of nomadic pastoralism.

Also, it has been discovered from the research that the natural grasses in Mela Village are not able to withstand the drought, after which the rain disappears for a short time. Pastoralists should begin cultivating African foxtail grass (Cenchrus Ciliaris) that is more productive, drought tolerant, extinct, and preferred by livestock.

What do pastoralists say?

Nashim Yusuph, one of the Mela Village pastoralists who participated in the research, advises her fellow pastoralists to establish their own pasture since it is critical for them to be able to feed their cattle during the dry season.

“Through out the research, I have learned a lot about appropriate technologies of pasture production which I will apply the same techniques on my farm”

Nashim together with her fellow pastoralist in the field where the research was conducted

What does the researcher say?

Onesmo says the importance of participatory research is to help farmers and pastoralists replicate what they have done in research on their own farms and apply the same proven techniques to get success and have high pasture production.

Onesmo observing African foxtail grasses on the field.

 In field conditions, while waiting for the laboratory results Researcher has the following recommendations 

  • Use of flat till method for pasture establishment because does not allow water flooding,
  • Use of cuttings/suckers because of fast sprouting compared with the use of seeds,
  • Use of 10 to 15 tones of cow dung per hector at transplanting time (top dressing method ), 
  • Timely weeding, Watering 3 times a week and keeping away from livestock/wild animal destruction 

Learn more from the researcher and Pastoralist through the video below


The Farmers and Pastoralist Collaboration (FPC) is kindly supported by the Biovison Foundation

Receiving the One World Award

What a big moment for the organic family!

We received in February the One World Award physically at our Head Quarter, handed over by Bernward Geier, the chairman of the OWA jury and former CEO of IFOAM.
It is a shining moment to be honored, and we want to thank everyone who supported us with our work over the past ten years.


Our story was also covered by the press, you can check it out here as well as here our thoughts on the organic movement.

Credits to IPP Media – ITV Tanzania for sharing our story.

Read more about the One World Award and our story from where it started to receive the Award.

From being a job seeker to having a successful agricultural business

Finding a proper job or a stable source of income has always been a significant challenge in the country. Meet Aisha Luka, who, despite knowing agriculture and entrepreneurship, she was still unable to have a secure source of income. Agriculture, on the other hand, is the backbone of the Tanzanian economy and According to World Bank (2016), agriculture provides a living for 66% of Tanzania’s population.

However, there is no better way to accomplish it than to do it responsibly by adhering to agroecological principles of farming that protect the environment while also increasing productivity. As a result, in 2019, Aisha Luka decided to join the Mapambano group, which is one of the farmer’s groups under the Austrian Development Agency, and the ICEP funded Dodoma Women in Agriculture and Business Initiatives (DWABI). Prior to adopting agroecological methods, Aisha would only collect up to 3 sacks of maize, sunflower, and groundnuts on 3 – acres of land, which resulted in a lower income of up to 500,000TZS per year but this will all change once she starts implementing these methods.

Who is Aisha?

Aisha Luka, a 42-year-old woman, mother of two, is married and living in Nzali village in Chilonwa ward in the Chawmino district, Dodoma. Dodoma is a semi-arid region with distinct dry and wet seasons of low rainfall below potential evapotranspiration, but it is not a desert, so farmers can boost productivity and improve soil fertility through agroecological approaches.


Aisha on one of her farms where she practices intercropping

Aisha had extensive training on proper farming methods like proper spacing, improvement of soil fertility using animal manure, intercropping, and application of mulch after joining the group. This shifted her entire agricultural perspective to a more sustainable one. She also uses quality local seeds in her process.

Another thing she managed to do was increase the amount of land she was growing by 133% from 3 acres to 7 acres. She currently harvests 15 bags of maize, 6 bags of Sorghum, and 15 bags of sunflowers which have doubled her income by 200% from 500,000TZS to 1,500,000TZS per year. This was a great success for Aisha as she confessed that she has never harvested such a quantity of products prior to joining the Mapambano group. This increased her household income and ensured food security for her family and community.

Aisha showing the concrete bricks for the new home she is constructing.

Aisha’s success in Agriculture and the entrepreneurship training she got from SAT has favored her in that she sees and utilizes any kind of entrepreneurship opportunities that crosses her way. Following few months after her training, Aisha saw an opportunity in her neighborhood and decided to utilize the opportunity to start up a small business making liquid soap and selling baobab fruits to earn some money. She also cultivates and sells tree seedlings to her neighbors as she is interested in afforestation because she knows that this is an important factor when it comes to improving soil fertility and increasing productivity in these dry areas.

Aisha shows the tree seedling which she plants and sells

Success in business

Her success has emerged fully that she was able to buy a piece of land of 0.15 acres for building a modern house for her family. She also keeps 15 cows for dairy, and has bought a motorcycle that generates 10,000TZS per day!


Aisha with her motorcycle which she bought for business

Aisha is a motivation to her fellow women in Chamwino; she has trained 6 groups of 182 farmers in Aisha is motivation to her fellow women in Chamwino; she has trained 6 groups of 182 farmers in Nzali and Mahama villages; moreover, she has facilitated the establishment of 6 demo plots and training on entrepreneurship, saving, and lending model. Currently, Aisha is making plans to start poultry farming.

DWABI Project is proudly supported by the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and ICEP

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